May 22, 1930 is the day that Harvey Milk was born. It is also Harvey Milk Day. Harvey was a gay rights activist in the 1970s who was the first openly elected gay city supervisor in San Francisco. He is responsible for passing several gay rights ordinances and is celebrated as one of the most famous openly gay politicians within the US. I admit I knew little about Harvey Milk before the making of the movie Milk, starring Sean Penn, but today is his day. This was made by the Harvey Milk Foundation, which itself was founded in 2009 Stuart Milk, Harvey’s nephew and Harvey’s political aide, Anne Kronenberg.


If you are unaware, there is a children’s book titled Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag that was written Rob Sanders and illustrated by Steven Salerno. This is a great story on Harvey and talks about the positives of love, hope, equality, and pride. I just received this myself and will be doing a video on it soon. Check it out when you get a chance. It is available on Amazon on both digital and printed formats: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0399555315/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_3rcbBbGTHPACJ


Unfortunately Harvey was assassinated in 1978, after only serving 11 months in office. In his time, he influenced many people to sway from hate and inspired others to help with the rights of all LGBT of the world. This is not a national holiday or even a day that many even know about about, but it is something to think about, even just for a few seconds. Harvey should be recognized for his achievements. It may seem insignificant, but I just bought a book of Harvey Milk stamps.
This stamp is available on the USPS website: www.Store.usps.com/store/product/buy-stamps/harvey-milk-S_472004.


If you are not aware of this, December 1st is World AIDS Day. Many have been lost in this fight against this illness and my heart goes out to all who have been affected by it. I stated this last year, but one of my uncles contracted the HIV virus back in the early 1990s and he developed full blown AIDS in a very short period of time. Remembering him is quite painful as I saw how horrible he deteriorated after such a short period of time. He was my only gay relative and he was quite a wonderful person.


Many living with HIV currently have a much better chance at living long full lives than those from the past, but even still, this is a very dangerous virus. The LGBT community was hit harshly back in the 1980-90s. I know many others who have lost loved ones and remember this much clearer than I do myself. Currently there are 36 million people around the world who are living with HIV. The CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) have stated that minorities are much more likely to be infected with gay/bisexual African American men having the highest rate of infection more so than any other population. So many people have been lost.


Besides using protection such as condoms, there is a drug to help prevent HIV known as Truvada also known as PrEP. It can be difficult to obtain a prescription from your doctor, but your health is worth the hassle. You should also know your status. Get tested regularly. It is free. Simply Go to FreeHIVTest.net to find an clinic or location in your area. If you are HIV positive and feel depressed, know that there are lots of counseling services out there for you. Go to: CareResource.org for more information.

I will not speak on this, but those out there living with HIV or those that know others that have been lost, be strong.

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