There is a children’s book based on Harvey Milk and the origin of the Rainbow Pride Flag of the LGBT community. This book is so deeply moving and such a powerful message aimed at children. That does not mean that adults cannot appreciate it as well though. Check out my thoughts on this book in the attached video.

This was written by Rob Sanders and illustrated by Steven Salerno.

If you are interested in this book, it is available in digital format for the Kindle or paperback version over on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Pride-Story-Harvey-Milk-Rainbow/


I have posted in the past about Joe Phillips, but he deserves repostings. His work is off the charts in terms of how phenomenal his skills are as an artist. This is not to mention that he exemplifies his work in modes of realism that represent subjects that are based on friends and those individuals that he has met in his life. I have been lucky to meet him several times are varying conventions and am proud to call him a friend. He has worked on many Pride projects in the past that are beyond beautiful.


Hey, who is that dorky guy (in the above picture) in the red tank top with his mouth open? Anyways, below are a few of his masterpieces that he has used in various media outlets.

His website is currently under production, but when he does update it, you can check it out over at: www.JoePhillips.com






Pride Month has been celebrated since 1970, after the Stonewall Riots in New York that took place the previous year. It was not the first LGBT Protest, but it was memorable and marked an event where Transgender/Gay/Lesbian population said this is enough bullying. The celebration of this month has been blurred through the decades with much more emphasis on partying rather than remembering that the LGBT community has been and still is harassed, scrutinized, belittle and continually oppressed. We show Pride in ourselves, our community and we are not any less than others. Everyone be safe.

Below is a picture of the first Pride Parade back in 1970.


I figured the cast of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia at a previous year’s Pride Parade was worth a re-post, because they’re awesome!


May 22, 1930 is the day that Harvey Milk was born. It is also Harvey Milk Day. Harvey was a gay rights activist in the 1970s who was the first openly elected gay city supervisor in San Francisco. He is responsible for passing several gay rights ordinances and is celebrated as one of the most famous openly gay politicians within the US. I admit I knew little about Harvey Milk before the making of the movie Milk, starring Sean Penn, but today is his day. This was made by the Harvey Milk Foundation, which itself was founded in 2009 Stuart Milk, Harvey’s nephew and Harvey’s political aide, Anne Kronenberg.


If you are unaware, there is a children’s book titled Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag that was written Rob Sanders and illustrated by Steven Salerno. This is a great story on Harvey and talks about the positives of love, hope, equality, and pride. I just received this myself and will be doing a video on it soon. Check it out when you get a chance. It is available on Amazon on both digital and printed formats: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0399555315/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_3rcbBbGTHPACJ


Unfortunately Harvey was assassinated in 1978, after only serving 11 months in office. In his time, he influenced many people to sway from hate and inspired others to help with the rights of all LGBT of the world. This is not a national holiday or even a day that many even know about about, but it is something to think about, even just for a few seconds. Harvey should be recognized for his achievements. It may seem insignificant, but I just bought a book of Harvey Milk stamps.
This stamp is available on the USPS website: www.Store.usps.com/store/product/buy-stamps/harvey-milk-S_472004.


If you were unaware of this, October is LGBT History month. I am no where near educated enough to provide insight to events that have taken place with regards to our past. As is, even currently, equality is not any where near where we should be as a society. Our current timeline of events have been harsh and cruel to say the least. However with some very strong people leading the way, there have been many victories as well. Some resources for events or just simply a history lesson, here a couple sites that I found informative:

There is an LGBT History site that provides info on many iconic figure and provides resources. Their website is located: LGBTHistoryMonth.com

I found a personal blog that regularly updates with LGBT historic events over at: GayWrites.org

There is the GLSEN.org site that gives historic details that I never even heard of before recently.


I do want to point out that one of the events that started off the modern LGBT movement was an annual protest event called The Reminder that took place each July 4 at Independence Hall in Philadelphia starting in 1965. The Stonewall Riots took place on June 28, 1969 to which the final Reminder protest happened one week later. The two leading figures during the Stonewall Riots were trans women Marsha P. Johnson and Silvia Rivera. Both women are sometimes ignored or completely forgotten when discussing this affair. I consider both to be such heroic women.